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In the News

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Mental health care is on trial in Norway when deciding what to do with Anders Behring Breivik. The confessed mass murderer who reportedly admitted to killing 78 people in two separate incidents, is seeking to prove his sanity at trial in an effort to write a book and become a “pseudo-political figure.” The problem is Norway is one of the countries where a mentally incompetent person cannot be punished — even if his crimes are unrelated to his psychosis. Time

An Athens County, Ohio Common Pleas Judge Michael Ward ruled a man with an IQ in the range of 60-80 can stand trial for allegedly raping two children. Judge Ward ordered the trial to continue, since experts could not agree on the competency of the defendant, and no specific case law dealing with, “a mentally retarded young man with psychiatric issues that cause him to believe it is his right to have sex with small children,” even though there is Ohio case law dealing with defendants who have developmental disabilities. Athens News

Do Tasers amount to excessive force? It is a question that is currently being decided by the Supreme Court and effects all citizens, including our most vulnerable. The Daily News

Op/Ed – How best to help juveniles that suffer from a mental illness? IndyStar

In The News

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The police have a tremendous amount of discretion how to handle a situation. In Boston, Massachusetts some are saying police need more training in how to deal with the mentally ill. Worcester Telegram

Montgomery County, Texas is starting an indigent defense program for the mentally ill. The program seeks to establish a support system for those with established mental illnesses and are convicted of crimes to reduce both costs and recidivism rates. Houston Community Newspapers

The mentally ill comprise a significant amount of the prison population. Jeff Gerritt, a columnist for the Detroit Free Press examines what can happen when the retributivist theory is applied to those who suffer from mental illness. Detroit Free Press

In The News

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In West Virgina people who have been involuntarily committed to a mental institution are entered on the FBI’s background check system and the State Mental Health Registry, even if doctors determine they never were mentally ill. Charleston Daily Mail

It should be no surprise since Arizona has privatized many of its prisons, that it is now privatizing the medical and mental-health care for the nearly 34,000 inmates in Arizona’s 10 state-run prisons. The problem is finding a reputable company who will perform all of the services and duties outlined in the contract. Arizona Republic

The Clubhouse model for treatment of serious mental health issues has some advantage that includes cost savings, compared to alternatives like mental hospitals. Should more attention be given to it? The Carrboro Citizen

The Massachusetts Department of Corrections have reached a deal with advocacy groups to create alternatives to disciplinary segregation for prisoners with mental illness. The suit resulted from the finding that inadequate care for mentally ill prisoners often resulted in inmate suicides. Boston Globe

In The News

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The insanity defense may be a tough sell for the soldier who is accused of murdering 16 civilians in Afganistan. Reuters

Schools around Boston are turning to private psychologists to be in-house counselors at their schools, using the students health insurance to help pay for it, under a fee-for-service model. – Boston Globe

Op/Ed – Time to Enforce Mental Health Parity. CT News

Some doctors are saying anti-psychotic drugs are over-prescribed. Once a medication is approved, doctors have the authority to prescribe the medication in way they think is best. The argument is if anti-psychotic drugs are being used as a crutch for some ailments. – MSNBC

In The News

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The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled, the forced medication (in an attempt to make him competent to stand trial) and commitment to a federal prison hospital, were justified in the case against Jared Loughner, the alleged gunman who shot U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, AZ Republic

The Army is reversing PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) diagnoses in large numbers. It is not clear why there is such a large reversal in diagnoses, but the Army is investigating to find out why. Associated Press

The Arizona case of Joe Sauceda Gallegos is highlighting there is a disconnect between the findings of the criminal courts, and the doctors of the state mental health hospital where patients are civilly committed. AZ Republic

The Arizona Republic published excerpts of recently executed Arizona inmate Robert Towery. The diary entries document, “the rituals, the security, the indignities and the humanity,” of his last few days on the death row, including the morning of his execution. AZ Republic

In the News

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Mental health care for immigrants is getting attention as critics say immigrants have less meaningful protections in place when in court. L.A. Times

Less money in public coffers, means less money for mental health treatment in New Orleans. The Times-Picayune

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is preparing its fifth edition. The DSM is the gold standard desktop reference for Psychiatrists and Physicians alike when it comes to mental disorders. That is why it is raising some eyebrows that “Internet addictions” may be listed in the book as a possible future diagnosis. New York Daily News

In the News

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Does grief after the passing of a love one warrant a place in the newest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)? Serious grief, known as beravement, is slated for inclusion for the first time, at this point in the most recent edition, DSM V. CNN

Is there a placebo effect when treating depression? CBS News

In Iowa, both parties Democrats and Republicans believe the mental health care system is broken and both have different plans of how to fix it. Press-Citizen

In Ohio where judges are elected by the public, past mental health issues by one of the candidates is coming to forefront of the election. Are past mental health issues fair game in judicial elections? Chronicle Telegram